Edita wears | Wearing white

Edita in Chichi London Dress, Dominic Walmsley London Jewellery 9

Edita in Chichi London Dress, Dominic Walmsley London Jewellery

Edita in Chichi London Dress, Dominic Walmsley London Jewellery  7

Edita in Chichi London Dress, Dominic Walmsley London Jewellery  2

Edita in Chichi London Dress, Dominic Walmsley London Jewellery 1

Edita in Chichi London Dress, Dominic Walmsley London Jewellery 5

Edita in Chichi London Dress, Dominic Walmsley London Jewellery 6

Edita in Chichi London Dress, Dominic Walmsley London Jewellery  4

Edita in Chichi London Dress, Dominic Walmsley London Jewellery 8

Edita in Chichi London Dress, Dominic Walmsley London Jewellery 9

Dress: c/o Chi Chi London (via House of Fraser), Necklace: Dominic Walmsley, Pumps: New Look
Images by Ahmed Fayed

I’m just a bleeping maniac in straight clothing. There’s no reason to dress my monster up.
– Glenn Frey

I bet I am going to get a phone call from my parents filled with subtle hints after them seeing this post. Ya know what I mean?

Even Ahmed suddenly got incredibly jovial seeing my outfit for our outing. I am pretty confident I’d find some nice jewellery-based (a particular type of ring, to be precise) links saved in his browsing history. I guess we all now know what the moral of this story is.

Meanwhile, I see a hint of Prada in this white Chi Chi London number, it is just so deliciously quirky, it simply demanded some punchy accessories. Green earrings and yellow pumps did the right trick.

It was a true pleasure to wear something light and festive on what appeared to be the last hurrah of summer in London.

Edita reports | The making of a collection

Edita at Fashion Capital 4

Edita at Fashion Capital 13

Edita at Fashion Capital 14

Edita at Fashion Capital 12

Edita at Fashion Capital 11Edita at Fashion Capital 10

Edita at Fashion Capital 9

Edita at Fashion Capital 8

Edita at Fashion Capital 7

Edita at Fashion Capital 6Edita at Fashion Capital 3

Edita at Fashion Capital 5

Edita at Fashion Capital 1

Edita at Fashion Capital 2
As LFW approaches, I get a call from a great friend of mine and couture designer, Omar Mansoor. He is keen to share with me the process behind the making of a collection, and I, in turn, want to illustrate to you why I am more likely to save up a little in order to buy a dress, even if there are cheap equivalents all over the market.

I enter Fashion Capital, a platform where independent designers can access a fashion studio equipped with pattern cutting, a myriad of fabrics, sewing machines to mock up ideas as well as get support from the true unsung heroes of fashion – seamstresses, as well as second opinions from fellow designers.

It’s convenient to forget about these skilled professionals when celebrity XYZ can simply parade in the finished product. So convenient in fact, that not only glory and acknowledgement have been reduced to nothing but also working conditions and salaries. We hear stories of sweatshop workers working in basements with their passports and dignity taken away – and think of them as just that, stories. Because of labour for nothing (or close to nothing), poorer synthetic fabrics and avoidance or completely minimising fees for hiring a factory (if the labourer simply works from the discomfort of their homes that are falling apart as there is no money for renovation), then of course the dress will sell for dirt cheap is making it an exciting prospect for bargain hunters. I mean it’s only a fiver like, I am totally getting this, but first – lemme take a fitting room selfie. And that is how this circle works.

After the catastrophe in Bangladesh which actually was reported on (many such examples are swept under the carpet), people are generally more aware of how sad and helpless the situation is. But simply knowing is not enough. If you want to know the more about the current state of fast fashion and how money is made, I urge you to read Lucy Siegle‘s book. I said it before, I’ll say it again – the book will open your eyes. And I am not paid for continuos endorsement of this book, it just IS that good.

That being said, no one is paying me to praise the platform that Fashion Capital is providing for independent designers. I feel very privileged and lucky that they kindly opened their doors to me – I could see people enjoying their jobs, progressing in their careers and working in a friendly and a pretty cool environment. But of course, it is hard work. If I am to purchase a dress by the designers who use Fashion Capital, I will know where my money is going. Sadly, having such knowledge is considered a luxury rather than the norm.

Fashion Capital – thank you for having me over, the world needs more places like yours. Another huge thanks to Omar for giving me a little intro into his newest collection – it’s going to be rock’n’roll!

Edita wears | Anchor and Crew

Edita in Anchor and crew, Helmut Lang, Pedro Miralles and Karl Lagerfeld 7

Edita in Anchor and crew, Helmut Lang, Pedro Miralles and Karl Lagerfeld 5

Edita in Anchor and crew, Helmut Lang, Pedro Miralles and Karl Lagerfeld 3

Edita in Anchor and crew, Helmut Lang, Pedro Miralles and Karl Lagerfeld

Edita in Anchor and crew, Helmut Lang, Pedro Miralles and Karl Lagerfeld 6

Edita in Anchor and crew, Helmut Lang, Pedro Miralles and Karl Lagerfeld 1

Edita in Anchor and crew, Helmut Lang, Pedro Miralles and Karl Lagerfeld 4

Top: TK Maxx, Skirt: Helmut Lang, Sandals: Pedro Miralles, Necklace: Anchor&Crew, Earrings: JeannieRichard
Images by Rebecca Cofie
I knew the fact that my Pedro Miralles sandals and this rather simple gym top shared same shade of blue was no simple coincidence. The pieces simply fell together, so all that was left was to photograph the look. The sole missing link was the right kind of tough yet minimalist jewellery. That’s when Anchor&Crew said ahoy, matey and introduced me to their world of sterling silver jewellery.

What I especially like about this necklace is its dark oxidised finish. It makes it look all the more nautical and somewhat poetic. As if it was lost at sea for centuries and resurfaced just yesterday. Perhaps it was me who found it in the sands on a sea shore? Or maybe it found me.

Edita reads | Alexander McQueen – Genius of a Generation by Kristin Knox

Edita reads Alexander McQueen - by Kristin Knox

Edita reads Alexander McQueen - by Kristin Knox 7

Edita reads Alexander McQueen - by Kristin Knox 3

Edita reads Alexander McQueen - by Kristin Knox 6

Edita reads Alexander McQueen - by Kristin Knox 5Edita reads Alexander McQueen - by Kristin Knox 4

Edita reads Alexander McQueen - by Kristin Knox 9

Edita reads Alexander McQueen - by Kristin Knox 11

Edita reads Alexander McQueen - by Kristin Knox 8

Edita reads Alexander McQueen - by Kristin Knox 12

Edita reads Alexander McQueen - by Kristin Knox 10

I’m gonna tell you something you don’t want to hear
I’m gonna show you where it’s dark, but have no fear.

– Kavinsky – Nightcall

I really wanted to write about the Savage Beauty exhibit at the V&A for a while now. It was equally important for me to honour the museum’s requirement for no photography. Considering the amount of people watching the Alexander McQueen exhibition, I don’t actually think it would be possible to make any good-angled photos in any case. Still, all the thoughts and feelings started to hoard in my head – a release was vitally necessary.

A few years ago, a good friend of mine gave me a fantastic book on the late designer – Alexander McQueen: Genius of the Generation by Kristin Knox. Coincidentally the book carries the same sentiment as the Savage Beauty exhibit, so combining the two was in the stars. I call it emotional fashion. McQueen’s designs provoke you to feel. It’s you and Lee against the world, the rest does not matter. The fact that the rest doesn’t matter, doesn’t matter either.

McQueen’s designs emphasised an art-or-die aesthetic and that’s what I’ve always loved about his work. Theatre, fine arts, literature as well as historic, traditional craft and metalwork – all of it has a home in McQueen’s creations. It’s art that touches the soul and fashion that makes one honoured to be the owner of a piece by Alexander McQueen. It’s an emotional whirlwind and you are no bystander, not even a mere participant. You are at the epicentre of it all, the culmination point, the reason. You, the viewer, not even the wearer, play the hugest role in McQueen’s fashion.

Some designers design clothes to wear, McQueen created clothes to watch. With our mouths open and without uttering a word. The fear of beauty. Savage, captivating, all-conquering, mind-enslaving beauty.

Edita wears | Irreplaceable

Edita in Boohoo heels, Sinequanone trench, Escada clutch and Wuwuk sunglasses

Edita-in-Boohoo-heels,-Sinequanone-trench,-Escada-clutch-and-Wuwuk-sunglasses-2

Edita-in-Boohoo-heels,-Sinequanone-trench,-Escada-clutch-and-Wuwuk-sunglasses-8

Edita in Boohoo heels, Sinequanone trench, Escada clutch and Wuwuk sunglasses 3

Edita in Boohoo heels, Sinequanone trench, Escada clutch and Wuwuk sunglasses 5

Edita in Boohoo heels, Sinequanone trench, Escada clutch and Wuwuk sunglasses 1

Edita in Boohoo heels, Sinequanone trench, Escada clutch and Wuwuk sunglasses 6Edita-in-Boohoo-heels,-Sinequanone-trench,-Escada-clutch-and-Wuwuk-sunglasses-7

Edita in Boohoo heels, Sinequanone trench, Escada clutch and Wuwuk sunglasses 9

Trench: Sinéquanone, Shoes: Boohoo, Sunglasses: c/o Wudwuk, Clutch bag: c/o Escada
Images by Ming Chan

“I love Yves Saint Laurent and Giambattista Valli and Givenchy, and I get given quite a lot, but perhaps nothing is as wonderful as the white fake leather trench coat I got when I was 15.”
– Natalia Vodianova

When it’s not too hot, nor it is too cold, the trench coat comes out. To be honest, living here in London, it never actually goes away. I think that’s the main reason why it is so quintessentially British. Come sunshine or rainfall, a trench coat has become my irreplaceable companion.

While out and about – I’ve also managed to convert this lovely Escada pouch into a clutch bag for the day. Its small size is extremely deceptive. I managed to throw in all of my needs for the day (think card, keys, smartphone, my Wudwuk sunnies when the sun went down, as well as lipstick and mirror), and there still a huge amount of space left for more stuff. My essentials in 2015 have certainly shrunk in size since the nineties. Just remember the size of our phones back then!

And the last thing I’d like to mention are the shoes. This pair from Boohoo may be inexpensive but it sure made me feel like a million. I believe it was Marilyn Monroe who said that all a girl needed to rule the world was a good pair of shoes. I wonder if she knew just how right she was.