Edita reports | Disaronno Wears Roberto Cavalli

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You know what’s fun? Sipping Disaronno cocktails at Roberto Cavalli’s on a very casual Wednesday. And after that? Trying on Cavalli’s finery. I am not sure I can imagine anything more luxurious than the gold leather jacket I refused to take off for a considerable period of time (but I did eventually – I didn’t want to be kindly asked to).

Generally Cavalli is a brand loved by fellow Eastern Europeans. It helps to define confidence, decadence, opulence and all of those terms combined. To explain it a bit better, I shall use Gossip Girl style metaphors: if Roger Vivier is Blair Waldorf, Cavalli is Chuck Bass.

When it comes to the design aesthetic, the label’s cuts are often so sharp, the wearer almost feels limited in his or her movement. But that’s okay. Anyone wearing Cavalli is not in a rush and is worth waiting for. That’s what makes the brand so timeless yet current.

This is why the brand’s collaboration with Disaronno is exciting. It’s giving some sexy skin to a sexy drink. I think I know what liqueur bottle will look most alluring when picking drinks for your New Year’s Eve soirée. It will be the one that wears Cavalli.

Edita reports | The Making Of A Collection

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As LFW approaches, I get a call from a great friend of mine and couture designer, Omar Mansoor. He is keen to share with me the process behind the making of a collection, and I, in turn, want to illustrate to you why I am more likely to save up a little in order to buy a dress, even if there are cheap equivalents all over the market.

I enter Fashion Capital, a platform where independent designers can access a fashion studio equipped with pattern cutting, a myriad of fabrics, sewing machines to mock up ideas as well as get support from the true unsung heroes of fashion – seamstresses, as well as second opinions from fellow designers.

It’s convenient to forget about these skilled professionals when celebrity XYZ can simply parade in the finished product. So convenient in fact, that not only glory and acknowledgement have been reduced to nothing but also working conditions and salaries. We hear stories of sweatshop workers working in basements with their passports and dignity taken away – and think of them as just that, stories. Because of labour for nothing (or close to nothing), poorer synthetic fabrics and avoidance or completely minimising fees for hiring a factory (if the labourer simply works from the discomfort of their homes that are falling apart as there is no money for renovation), then of course the dress will sell for dirt cheap is making it an exciting prospect for bargain hunters. I mean it’s only a fiver like, I am totally getting this, but first – lemme take a fitting room selfie. And that is how this circle works.

After the catastrophe in Bangladesh which actually was reported on (many such examples are swept under the carpet), people are generally more aware of how sad and helpless the situation is. But simply knowing is not enough. If you want to know the more about the current state of fast fashion and how money is made, I urge you to read Lucy Siegle‘s book. I said it before, I’ll say it again – the book will open your eyes. And I am not paid for continuos endorsement of this book, it just IS that good.

That being said, no one is paying me to praise the platform that Fashion Capital is providing for independent designers. I feel very privileged and lucky that they kindly opened their doors to me – I could see people enjoying their jobs, progressing in their careers and working in a friendly and a pretty cool environment. But of course, it is hard work. If I am to purchase a dress by the designers who use Fashion Capital, I will know where my money is going. Sadly, having such knowledge is considered a luxury rather than the norm.

Fashion Capital – thank you for having me over, the world needs more places like yours. Another huge thanks to Omar for giving me a little intro into his newest collection – it’s going to be rock’n’roll!

Edita reads | Couture Wedding Gowns By Marie Bariller

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We place so much expectation on a wedding dress. It has to be the “one”, “the” dress, the “most important dress a woman will wear in her life”. Sounds very stressful, if you ask me. Since we’re on the topic of questioning the system, here’s another thing I can’t figure out: Most important, eh… Says who?

Who said that one’s wedding dress has to be all of the above? With a tank full of questions, I opened the tome on wedding attire – Couture Wedding Gowns by Marie Bariller. This book is no laughing matter and I can afford no sarcasm, in fact I can’t afford anything at all – this is a catalogue of the most expensive dresses in the world. It doesn’t go above the prices of the creations listed here.

From Alberta Ferretti, Chanel through Jean Paul Gaultier to Zuhair Murad, this book has the biggest wedding dress masterminds profiled, quoted and their brilliant creations exhibited. There were a few names I expected to see but didn’t. One was Bruce Oldfield, the other Catherine Walker. I felt at least one traditional British couture house had to be in – but not on this occasion.

That doesn’t take away from the wedding lalaland that this book easily makes any bride (or not yet bride) escape to. If you didn’t know what dress was for you, after opening this book you will. You just will. Even if it’s not published in this bridal bible.

What made it interesting for me is that this book reveals what it feels for the designer him or herself to sketch, conceptualise and make a wedding gown. For these types of commissions fashion and trends take the backseat while personality and emotions are the Anna Wintours on the front row. Designing a wedding dress is an intimate affair for everyone involved.

I still find it mind-blowing that the couturier’s task is to summarise a woman as a dress, a white one. Sounds like an extraordinarily strict brief, but this is what separates the boys from the men of wedding couture: one white dress, not any two alike. That well may be the reason why it is “the” dress – it is an extension of the woman. Without her it is nothing and on her, everything.

Thank you Abrams and Chronicle for my copy. You can buy yours directly from the publisher too.

Edita reads | Piaget

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When I was a teen, I remember hating watches. I thought they were just plain ugly pieces that one was supposed to wear when he was older. I now know why I felt this way – I had no good examples to look at. Piaget was not a word in my vocabulary. Thank goodness for growing older and growing wiser. Thank goodness for this book.

The truth is this tome (and it is certainly a tome as it is heavier than my monthly grocery shop) is not necessarily for jewellery lovers. If you consider yourself one, you will delight in looking at the pretty pictures and the vintage Piaget ads here and there. You will be limited to this though.

To truly soak in the glory of this book, you must be willing to immerse yourself in the world of jewellery, from the meticulous process of making it, marketing the goods, through to understanding a brand with historical significance. All of these aspects are covered in Piaget, so to really enjoy this book in a maximalist sense, being a jewellery lover is simply not enough – you must have a healthy obsession with fine jewellery and watchmaking.

Lest we forget that Piaget is the brand that invented jewellery that tells time. That is a radically different way of looking at traditional watchmaking, that is known to be rather rigid and almost exclusively masculine. This is the moment when you picture a man (à la David Gandy) in a a sharp suit looking to his right, a golden Rolex around his wrist nonchalantly shining in the morning sun. Piaget thought, yes, let’s have that. But let’s also make watches sexy and exaggerated. So add a particularly feminine lady in front of our David Gandy lookalike wearing stacks of fine jewels and no watches. After all it’s her timeless jewellery that tells time. Genius.

From 1874 to this day Piaget has stayed within the confines of its own motto: Always do better than necessary. Because of that as time goes by, Piaget’s jewellery keeps on ticking as the brand’s diamonds and emeralds continue shining on. Get this book to find out just how brightly.

This book is written by Florence Müller. Photographs are by Philippe Garcia and Steve Hiett. Get a copy via Abrams and Chronicle. Thank you for my copy!

Edita reports | The Jewel Of Mayfair

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All of the above makes me want to throw a humongous party, wedding or otherwise. Just imagine to throw an Oscar de la Renta gown on paired with Amrapali jewels, pop some fantastic Aruna Seth heels on and put all of your necessities (phone, card, keys, mirror, lipstick – space for nothing more) into a personalised Judith Leiber clutch bag. All of this effort, only to sit down at the world’s most lavish red velvet themed diner table. Endless diner table, just to clarify.

And somehow, it’s all worth the all consuming beauty that I saw displayed at the Jewel of Mayfair event organised by ThinkShaadi. I can’t remember an event where I felt so tiny compared to the richness of every detail I laid my eyes on. I felt I was eaten alive by the grandeur. Is it wrong to say that I didn’t mind?