Edita wears | Victoriana

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Fashion blogger all black outfit

Dress: Ghost (Similar Here), Pumps: Clarks, Hat: ASOS
Photography: Tina Muller
The dress that I am wearing is by one of the loveliest brands out there called Ghost. Their dresses are genuinely addicting (I bought three, so no #spon here). This specific one had to be in my wardrobe. After watching Winchester (2018), I was inspired by the beautiful authentic detail in the movie. This of course meant that I got obsessed with Victoriana style and wanted to do a modern take on it, hence the photoshoot.

Having said that, the Victorian era was rather interesting in the UK. I wanted to share some of the very buttoned-up insights I found while obsessing over everything that is to do with the Victorian period (1837-1901). By the way, there are tons more! I mean TONS. Considering that I wearing head to toe black, I decided to look at the darker facts from the era.

  1. Mourning Jewellery: Queen Victoria made mourning not only fashionable but also a lucrative business. The Widow of Windsor as some called her was known for (among other things) mourning her husband’s passing for forty years. That’s forty years of trying to avoid public appearances and wearing exclusively black. Following in the country’s leader’s footsteps, the savvy businessmen saw a gap in the market. If mourning is a thing: we will capitalise on it, they thought. And so, mourning attire, mourning jewellery was widely popular. By the way, if you pop to an antique shop or two, you still might be able to find mourning jewellery worn by women of the Victorian era.
  2. Spiritualism: Oh yes, seances were considered a cool leisure activity. Imagine a dark room, a circular table, people holding hands while a medium attempts to speak to those who are no longer with us. I am no expert in ghosts or mediums, but I know for a fact that charlatans had tons of success during the Victorian era. After all, a person who lost a loved one would do anything to feel they are still there. Hello emotional exploitation.
  3. Curiosities: People LOVED weird things. From collecting unique items, ie a brain in a jar, in their “cabinets of curiosities” to side shows or freak shows, people loved a bit of a shock here and there – only a little though, as society life was rigorously controlled, so enjoy it too much and you will be judged and shunned.
  4. Death Photography: Pink once sang, “In our family portrait we look pretty happy, Let’s play pretend, act like it goes naturally”. In the Victorian era they’d sing a slightly different song. Death photography was quite fashionable. This meant staging a scene where a dead family member would look alive and sit or stand among his or her relatives. Or look like they are sleeping, or just you know… Chilling. The creepy thing? No matter how well a photo was staged, you’d always know who the dead one was.
  5. Horror Literature: Hello Dracula, Frankenstein, The Picture of Dorian Gray, The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde – among many more goodies were penned in this era.

Do you know any other dark facts about the Victorian era?

Edita wears | On The Streets Of Berlin

Edita in Ghost dress, Toga boots and Chanel bag 2Edita in Ghost dress, Toga boots and Chanel bag 4Edita in Ghost dress, Toga boots and Chanel bag 1Edita in Ghost dress, Toga boots and Chanel bag 3Edita in Ghost dress, Toga boots and Chanel bagEdita in Ghost dress, Toga boots and Chanel bag 5

Dress: c/o Ghost, Shoes: Toga, Jacket: Zara, Bag: Chanel, Collar: Vintage Fox Fur and Amber
Images by: Rebecca Cofie

Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!
Ronald Reagan, Former President of the United States, speech at the Brandenburg Gate, 1987

And so they did.

I heard so many different points of view before going to Berlin. Some were praising the city, others were saying it was rather grimy. This made me very curious – what is the mystery behind the inconsistency of everyone’s memory of Berlin? Is it a Vienna kind of city or is it a Warsaw type?

That’s when I saw something that Jack Lang, former French culture minister, noted. He said: “Paris is always Paris and Berlin is never Berlin.” And that’s so true. If I come back in a year’s time, it will probably be a completely different experience – it’s constantly being constructed, reconstructed, deconstructed in a never ending circle. And that’s the beauty of Berlin – a city that’s buzzing yet isn’t as saturated as a beehive. A city that boasts memorable architecture but lacks in equivalents of the Eiffel Tower, the Notre Dame, the Big Ben.

In fact, the piece of architecture it is famous for is simply not there. And yet millions come year on year admiring this beautiful torn down nothingness.

Edita wears | Film Noir

Edita in Rose Red and Ghost dressEdita-in-Rose-Red-and-Ghost-dress.-3Edita in Rose Red and Ghost dress. 4Edita in Rose Red and Ghost dress. 5

Dress: c/o Ghost, Jewellery: c/o Rosa Red Jewellery
Location: Berlin, Germany
Images by: Rebecca Cofie
There’s nothing to take away and nothing to add. Instead, I shall leave you with some of my favourite quotes from the world’s greatest film noirs.

“I like the dark. It’s friendly.”
Cat People (1942)

“You know when a woman loves you like that, she can love you with every card in the deck and then pull a knife across your throat the next morning.”
Johnny Eager (1942)

“I want you to do something. I want you to get yourself out of the bed, and get over to the window and scream as loud as you can. Otherwise you only have another three minutes to live.”
Sorry, Wrong Number (1948)

“You oughta have more sense than to take chances with strangers like this.”
“It’s funny, but practically all the people I know were strangers when I met them.”
The Blue Dahlia (1946)

“Where were you last night?”
“That’s so long ago, I don’t remember.”
“Will I see you tonight?”
“I never make plans that far ahead.”

Casablanca (1942)

“I thought we agreed that women and gambling didn’t mix.”
“My wife does not come under the category of women.”

Gilda (1946)