Edita reports | Thomas Sabo Autumn-Winter 2016

Edita at Thomas Sabo Launch Event 5

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Thomas Sabo is a brand that allows you to be sentimental. Its classic charm bracelets literally ruled the world a few years back to the point that I probably was the only person on the planet who didn’t have a Thomas Sabo charmed piece. I have never seen a jewellery brand completely dominate the market in such a short period of time, cementing the personalised jewellery trend, and leading the way for other labels to follow.

Last week I had an exclusive first look at the brand’s Autumn-Winter 2016 offering. Bohemian vibes, mysticism and hieroglyphics of ancient Egypt have driven the jewellery giant in a different direction from sentimentalism to symbolism.

Deeper, darker, more decadent pieces have always lured me, so this collection is something I definitely look forward to wearing. After all, jewellery is good for the soul. And well-carved, meaningful and alluring jewellery is even better.

Edita wears | Secret Garden

Edita in Meteor Shower London, Dior, Silhouette, Levis, Poelman 2

Edita in Meteor Shower London, Dior, Silhouette, Levis, Poelman 3

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Edita in Meteor Shower London, Dior, Silhouette, Levis, Poelman 7

Edita in Meteor Shower London, Dior, Silhouette, Levis, Poelman 9

Top: Meteor Shower London, Camisole: Dior, Denim: Levis, Sunglasses: c/o Silhouette, Chunky Slippers: Poelman
Images by Ahmed Fayed

These flower walls most certainly form a temple. A place where it’s peaceful, serene and silent. I could stay here forever and then a while longer.

This truly magical place served as a magnificent backdrop to my somewhat casual Sunday look. I was genuinely excited to rock the ugly shoe trend. Think Birkenstocks, chunky slippers and clunky platforms. I used to love slippers like the ones I am wearing in the photos in the 90s, that is when I didn’t wear Spice Girls platform boots. These mules/sandals/slippers would sort me out throughout the entire summer in all of their ugly glory, complete with an awkward platform, a rough finish and heaps of comfort. I weirdly adored them then and I weirdly adore them now. Though if I ever start talking about classic crocs this way – please slap me.

Going up, my look suddenly turns whimsical. This very fairytale-like top from Meteor Shower London, Dior camisole, pearls and messy braid add a boho twist to the entire look, elevating it where the 90s slipper dragged it down. It’s all a fine balancing act, really.

To finish off the outfit, I went for this pair of sunglasses by Silhouette from the brand’s collaboration with Wes Gordon. I wanted a very soft culmination point, and these sunnies delivered just that, perhaps not aesthetically as they payed homage to the slipper at the bottom of the look, but by design as they were light as a feather. Another instance where the importance of balance is underlined. With all of this manoeuvring and balancing – perhaps I missed my calling being a ballet dancer? A prima ballerina would look just at home in this secret garden after all.

Edita wears | The Trench Dress

Edita in H&M, Boohoo and Chanel 1

Edita in H&M, Boohoo and Chanel 10

Edita in H&M, Boohoo and Chanel 3

Edita in H&M, Boohoo and Chanel 2

Edita in H&M, Boohoo and Chanel 9

Edita in H&M, Boohoo and Chanel 6

Edita in H&M, Boohoo and Chanel 5

Edita in H&M, Boohoo and Chanel 4

Edita in H&M, Boohoo and Chanel 7

Edita in H&M, Boohoo and Chanel 8

Trench (Worn As Dress): H&M, Heels: Boohoo, Bag: Chanel
Images by Ming Chan
To describe my personal style, I’d like to put a picture in your head. Have you watched a cartoon called Dexter’s Laboratory as a kid? Remember that episode called Lab of the Lost where Dee Dee and Dexter venture out to the “old part of the lab“?

In that particular episode, you may recall seeing some of Dexter’s first ever inventions, those that were flawed and forgotten. These were the ones that forced the boy genius to improve and achieve more. I see my personal style and this blog just like Dexter’s secret laboratory; most recent posts being “my greatest creations“, while the first outfits merely a synonym to the “old part of the lab”, where I rarely venture to – I think I may need a Dee Dee myself to help me go there. Yikes!

My personal style is always evolving, it’s much braver and more daring than it used to be when I just started archiving my outfits. It’s a daily experiment. In fact, it scares me to think that this article in two or three years’ time too will end up along with the “old inventions“.

But we’ve got plenty of time still, so let’s talk about it. This is my attempt to nail the minimalist trend. Can you think of an outfit more minimal than just some shoes and a trench coat? This silky H&M piece made me feel that it would be genuinely rude to add anything else. And goodness me, I wouldn’t want to be rude!

The final question is: Can this look be recreated for a person who is less keen on being described by a 2003 Britney Spears lyric to the song Outrageous: “Trench coat and my underwear / Let’s go with this freak show“?

The answer is, yes it can. Take Man Repeller’s Leandra Medine’s recent look for example here (she is wearing clothes underneath as a reasonable human being should), Chiara Ferragni’s of The Blonde Salad pink Sonia Rykiel coat or indeed Mira Duma’s fabulous Valentino coat-dress outfit (I will leave it to your imaginations to establish if they Britney’ed it or not).

Whatever trench-as-dress style you end up going for, it seems that you are in epic fashion company. Plus, you’ve always got me and I come with cookies. Or kookiness… And a box set of Cartoon Network series.

Edita reads | Andrew Gallimore by Rankin

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You know it’s a good coffee table book when you simply can’t put it down. There are no words, just visuals. Addictive, addictive visuals.

I am talking about Andrew Gallimore by Rankin. If you are into make up, can’t leave the house without mascara, are more particular about your contouring rather than your coffee – this book is your new inspo-board.

This is a chronicle of many faces created by Andrew Gallimore – Nars’ make up ambassador, Hunger Magazine’s Beauty-Editor-At-Large – and immortalised by Rankin. I don’t know why some of these looks still haven’t debuted in edgy pop music videos. Iconic status guaranteed.

Like the book itself, which only has a short interview with Andrew towards the end, almost reminiscent of a bibliography section, I will not speak too much about it. It’s a clever tactic by the publisher who is clearly keen on giving art a chance to speak for itself. Sometimes with all of our interpretations, reviews, thoughts we dilute the art itself. What do you remember more: all of Da Vinci’s paintings or the conspiracy theories in the Da Vinci code? I personally just see the Mona Lisa in front of me and a list of thesis stated by scientists and fanatics. Only if I focus my grey cells, then I see more art pieces by Da Vinci. We, the reviewers, journalists, scholars at times tend to put our words on the same pedestal as our subjects. That definitely is not right.

Not this art tome. Here, we shut up and enjoy. Silence and appreciation. I shall leave you to it.

I’d like to thank team Rankin for my copy. You can get the book here too.