Edita wears | Double denim

Edita-in-Bf's-Shirt,-Asos-pearls,-RosaRed-necklace-New-Look-shoes,-Chanel-bag-and-glasses-6Edita in Bf's Shirt, Asos pearls, RosaRed necklace New Look shoes, Chanel bag and glasses 8Edita in Bf's Shirt, Asos pearls, RosaRed necklace New Look shoes, Chanel bag and glasses 4Edita in Bf's Shirt, Asos pearls, RosaRed necklace New Look shoes, Chanel bag and glassesEdita in Bf's Shirt, Asos pearls, RosaRed necklace New Look shoes, Chanel bag and glasses 9Edita in Bf's Shirt, Asos pearls, RosaRed necklace New Look shoes, Chanel bag and glasses 3Edita in Bf's Shirt, Asos pearls, RosaRed necklace New Look shoes, Chanel bag and glasses 2Edita-in-Bf's-Shirt,-Asos-pearls,-RosaRed-necklace-New-Look-shoes,-Chanel-bag-and-glasses-5Edita in Bf's Shirt, Asos pearls, RosaRed necklace New Look shoes, Chanel bag and glasses 7Edita in Bf's Shirt, Asos pearls, RosaRed necklace New Look shoes, Chanel bag and glasses 1

Bag, earrings and glasses: Chanel, Denim: Levi’s (c/o House of Fraser), Pumps: New Look, Necklace: c/o RosaRed, Pearls: Asos
Images by Ahmed Fayed

“I have often said that I wish I had invented blue jeans: The most spectacular, the most practical, the most relaxed and nonchalant. They have expression, modesty, sex appeal, simplicity – all I hope for in my clothes.”
Yves Saint Laurent

And so I walk in the park and gardens where Anne Boleyn used to walk. While the Tudors went on pleasant strolls in their finery and pearls, I go in double denim and let the pearls remain. In today’s terms, I am overdressed. I can’t decide whether that’s funny or sad.

Edita wears | Pieces of Italy

Edita in Italy wearing Vero Milano, Clarks and HM dress 5Edita in Italy wearing Vero Milano, Clarks and HM dress 9Edita in Italy wearing Vero Milano, Clarks and HM dress 7Edita in Italy wearing Vero Milano, Clarks and HM dress 10Edita in Italy wearing Vero Milano, Clarks and HM dress 8Edita in Italy wearing Vero Milano, Clarks and HM dress 3Edita in Italy wearing Vero Milano, Clarks and HM dress 4Edita in Italy wearing Vero Milano, Clarks and HM dress 6Edita in Italy wearing Vero Milano, Clarks and HM dress 2Edita in Italy wearing Vero Milano, Clarks and HM dress 11 Edita in Italy wearing Vero Milano, Clarks and HM dress 1Edita in Italy wearing Vero Milano, Clarks and HM dress

Jacket: Vero Milano, Sunglasses: Prada, Boots: Clarks, Dress: H&M, Jewellery: Amrapali

“Good night, good night! parting is such sweet sorrow,
That I shall say good night till it be morrow.”

William Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet

Coming back to London from beautiful Verona and its surroundings was a true test of will for me. Missing my flight and staying in that state of mind was a very alluring prospect. But then I thought, it’s not necessarily the place that made it special, it was the circumstance – a wedding of a friend so close, calling her a friend feels too distant.

Buying a ticket to Italy is easy, but buying a ticket to pure happiness is very hard. Especially because this state of bliss always has a time cap on it – why is it that we designed a life where human joy is temporary and the mundane is the norm?

Edita wears | New aesthetics

Edita in Dorotea P London, Chanel, Givenchy and BCBG 5Edita in Dorotea P London, Chanel, Givenchy and BCBG 6Edita in Dorotea P London, Chanel, Givenchy and BCBG 3Edita in Dorotea P London, Chanel, Givenchy and BCBGEdita in Dorotea P London, Chanel, Givenchy and BCBG 2Edita in Dorotea P London, Chanel, Givenchy and BCBG 4Edita in Dorotea P London, Chanel, Givenchy and BCBG 1

Top and skirt: Dorotea P London, Necklace: Givenchy, Bag: Chanel, Ring: Yunus and Eliza, Pumps: BCBG, Sunglasses: Gucci
Images by Dorotea Pospihalj

“New aesthetics, new education, new ways of relating to the outside world and new relationship with oneself. They all have a common starting point – quality.”
Dorotea Pospihalj

Edita reads | Piaget

Edita reads Piaget By Florence , Philippe Garcia and Steve Hiett 10Edita reads Piaget By Florence , Philippe Garcia and Steve HiettEdita reads Piaget By Florence , Philippe Garcia and Steve Hiett 5Edita reads Piaget By Florence , Philippe Garcia and Steve Hiett 3Edita reads Piaget By Florence , Philippe Garcia and Steve Hiett 7Edita reads Piaget By Florence , Philippe Garcia and Steve Hiett 9Edita reads Piaget By Florence , Philippe Garcia and Steve Hiett 6Edita reads Piaget By Florence , Philippe Garcia and Steve Hiett 1Edita reads Piaget By Florence , Philippe Garcia and Steve Hiett 8Edita reads Piaget By Florence , Philippe Garcia and Steve Hiett 2Edita reads Piaget By Florence , Philippe Garcia and Steve Hiett 4

When I was a teen, I remember hating watches. I thought they were just plain ugly pieces that one was supposed to wear when he was older. I now know why I felt this way – I had no good examples to look at. Piaget was not a word in my vocabulary. Thank goodness for growing older and growing wiser. Thank goodness for this book.

The truth is this tome (and it is certainly a tome as it is heavier than my monthly grocery shop) is not necessarily for jewellery lovers. If you consider yourself one, you will delight in looking at the pretty pictures and the vintage Piaget ads here and there. You will be limited to this though.

To truly soak in the glory of this book, you must be willing to immerse yourself in the world of jewellery, from the meticulous process of making it, marketing the goods, through to understanding a brand with historical significance. All of these aspects are covered in Piaget, so to really enjoy this book in a maximalist sense, being a jewellery lover is simply not enough – you must have a healthy obsession with fine jewellery and watchmaking.

Lest we forget that Piaget is the brand that invented jewellery that tells time. That is a radically different way of looking at traditional watchmaking, that is known to be rather rigid and almost exclusively masculine. This is the moment when you picture a man (à la David Gandy) in a a sharp suit looking to his right, a golden Rolex around his wrist nonchalantly shining in the morning sun. Piaget thought, yes, let’s have that. But let’s also make watches sexy and exaggerated. So add a particularly feminine lady in front of our David Gandy lookalike wearing stacks of fine jewels and no watches. After all it’s her timeless jewellery that tells time. Genius.

From 1874 to this day Piaget has stayed within the confines of its own motto: Always do better than necessary. Because of that as time goes by, Piaget’s jewellery keeps on ticking as the brand’s diamonds and emeralds continue shining on. Get this book to find out just how brightly.

This book is written by Florence Müller. Photographs are by Philippe Garcia and Steve Hiett. Get a copy via Abrams and Chronicle. Thank you for my copy!